Thursday, March 7, 2013

Additional Security

I am not the Safety Police in our house, but with the projects recently, you’d think I was!

Mr. JCrew proudly holds that title. Every time I hang something (turtle shell, elephants) he makes sure I have securely fastened them to the wall.

I recently showed you how I went around and fastened all the furniture to the wall to prevent tipping, and although I see the fasteners, I’ve gotten use to them and I feel better knowing they won’t tip.

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To continue on my safety streak, I got a tip from my dad. My dad has so much useful knowledge that I’m going to start doing posts filed under ‘Dad’s Shop’ so that I can start collecting all these tidbits and not forget. I can ask my Dad a question that is phrased out of order and using made up words, and he knows what I am trying to say and has a solution!

Before Mom and Dad left to go out of town recently, they made sure their home was secure. We aren’t paranoid people, but it’s a nice feeling knowing you’ve done all you could and no harm was done because you were neglectful. I once had my car ransacked because I left the car unlocked in the driveway. My own fault! I was too lazy to lock the door with the clicker from my window.

We had a break-in in the neighborhood two months ago and the police report said the intruder entered through the back door. The deadbolt held up, but the doorframe did not. It made me curious as to how my doorframe was secured to the house.

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We bought 3 inch decking screws to go into the frame.

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I drilled a pilot hole smaller than the screw about every six inches or so.

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After the pilot hole, I used a countersink tool on my drill that created a cone shape entrance to the pilot hole.

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This allowed the screw to bury into the frame and I could wood putty over it.

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My dad has all the cool tools. He let me borrow that countersink bit for my drill.

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Now that the door framing is secure to the house, I told Mr. JCrew he could slam doors all he wants and I would not mind! He is not a door slammer, but he has my permission to become one.

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Just like usual, during the project, I found a better way to do it. The bottom half of the front door, I put the screws out in the open. You can easily see them when the door is ajar. I then realized I could be putting the screws behind the rubber seal as much as possible and they would be almost hidden.

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I still have to go back and putty and paint over them.

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During the installation on three doors (front, back, garage) I only found three nails in the frames! Those three nails were in one door. I really hope those aren’t the only things holding the frame to the house, but I never ran into any during the install.

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I was really glad I took the extra precaution to make sure our door couldn’t be kicked in. It’s not that we have things to steal that are of value, but I don’t like the feeling of being violated. Plus, I have kids to protect now! 

Do I get a Safety Patrol badge for this? I loved being a Safety Patrol in Elementary school. I got to do it in both fourth and fifth grade. And then the patrols got to go to DC for a week. Do they do that anymore?

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